Professors of Physics, Graduate School of Science

Professors with 「*」 do not take graduate students.
Professors with 「#」 do not take master's graduate students.
Professors with 「!」 has spesial report.
SUBCOURSE NOTES NAME BUREAU URL E-mail THEME
A7 Munehito ARAI Department of Arts and Science http://folding.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ arai@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp Biophysics, protein folding, and protein design. Proteins are essential substances that drive life processes. (1) We study physical properties of proteins, in particular, how proteins form specific structures and exert their functions. We also study the structure-function relationship in intrinsically disordered proteins. (2) We develop novel proteins useful in medicine and industry.
A7 Chikara FURUSAWA Department of Physics furusawa@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp The aim of our study is to understand robustness and plasticity of complex biological dynamics involving a large number of components, including adaptation, evolution, development and immune system. By using computer simulations of simple models, theoretical analysis, and high-throughput experimental measurements, we will try to extract universal characteristics of biological dynamics and to establish macroscopic theories for biological robustness and plasticity.
A7 # Hideo HIGUCHI Department of Physics http://nanobio.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/higuchipro/ higuchi at phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp
A7 Sosuke ITO Universal Biology Institute sosuke.ito@ubi.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp We theoretically study non-equilibrium statistical physics to understand biological information processing. Especially, we study stochastic thermodynamics, thermodynamics of information, information geometry, and biological signal transduction.
A7 *# Kunihiko KANEKO Department of Arts and Science http://chaos.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp Explore universal logic underlying biological systems, by expanding theory of dynamical systems and statistical physics. Uncover universal law in reproduction, adaptation, development, differentiation, and evolution. Study of high-dimensional chaos that potentially relate with life and cognition.
A7 Hiroshi NOGUCHI The Institute for Solid State Physics http://noguchi.issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp/index.html noguchi at issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp Study of soft-matter and biophysics using theory and simulation. Particularly, dynamics of biomembrane from nano to micro meter. i) Deformation of red blood cells in microvessels. ii) Fusion and fission of biomembrane. We also develop hydrodynamic methods and coarse-grained molecular models.
A7 Akinao NOSE Department of Complexity Science and Engineering http://bio.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ nose at phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp Biophysics of the nervous system. We use the fruit fly, Drosophila, as a model to try to understand the operational principle of neural circuits, based on the realistic neuronal connectivity and activity pattern. We use optogenetics, calcium imaging and electrophysiology to record and manipulate neural activity and connectome analyses to dissect neural wiring. By systematically using these techniques, we try to elucidate the functional connectivity among component neurons and information processing of the neural circuits.
A7 Masato OKADA Department of Complexity Science and Engineering http://mns.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ okada@edu.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp We study brain functions such as memory and vision using methods of statistical mechanics. We also develop statistical-mechanical informatics focusing on the similarity between the framework of Bayesian inference and that of statistical mechanics. We have recently started to promote ‘Data-Driven Science’ for the purpose of establishing an efficient methodology to extract scientific knowledge from high-dimensional data.
A7 Yasushi OKADA Department of Physics http://www.okada-lab.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/en/about y.okada@riken.jp We want to answer “What is Life?” through a viewpoint of physics. For that purpose, we have been developing imaging technologies including super-resolution microscopy, in order to make quantitative measurements in living cells, such as the transport within a cell, especially a neural cell. Recently, we have demonstrated that the phase transition of the conformation of a protein polymer, a microtubule, regulates the directionality of the transport. We are also applying non equilibrium statistical physics to the cellular phenomena. For example, we are developing a non-invasive method to measure force exerted to the vesicles during the intracellular transport by applying the fluctuation theorem.
A7 Kuniyoshi SAKAI Department of Arts and Science http://mind.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/index.html kuni@sakai-lab.jp
Professors with 「*」 do not take graduate students.
Professors with 「#」 do not take master's graduate students.
Professors with 「!」 has spesial report.